Useful For Entrepreneurs

Three Career Paths for Educational Innovators—How to Get There and Where the Jobs Are

The seeds of innovation are planted at a young age, and technological advances now provide learners of all ages the opportunity to be creators, builders, designers, producers and makers. STEAM-based learning emphasizes both hands-on and digital experiences with engineering, art, game design, prototyping in makerspaces, authoring, robotics, and much more. Students and teachers are learning to innovate hand-in-hand. Where there is innovation, entrepreneurship often follows.

How Tech Tools Helped a Part-Time Tutor Become a Full-Time Entrepreneur

As a tutor, Josh Sohn doesn’t simply help students complete their homework or ace their SATs. He tries to make learning profound, “lift and support” the kids he works with, and demonstrate an engagement some parents just can’t provide; he even helped persuade one student not to drop out of school.

How to Use Real World Problems to Teach Design Thinking, 3D Printing and Collaboration

Rich Lehrer knew that 3D printers could do more than spit out keychains and Yoda heads. In 2013, he led a group of eighth graders at the Brookwood School in Manchester-by-the-Sea, Massachusetts that designed and printed a prosthetic hand for Lehrer’s then 3-year-old son, Max. 

Build Empathy and Find the Joy—How to Combine Making and Entpreneurism in Your Classroom

You know how they say antipathy is the mother of invention? Five years ago Karen P. Kaun, founder of Makeosity, was running a New York City-based nonprofit that helped teachers bring hands-on STEAM projects into their classrooms, when she started thinking about how much some kids really hate school. “They just can’t relate to it," says Kaun. "You go to school so you can go to college so you can get a job. But that seems so far away to them. What they learn in schools is so unrelated to what they learn online or what their daily lives are like.

Building a Bridge from 21st Century Learners to 21st Century Earners

Millennials are expected to change jobs or employers four times in their first ten years after college graduation. By age 40, they’ll likely have shown up for work with between 10 and 15 employers. This means that our future workforce should expect to have seasons of work, non-work, as well as periods of looking for work in between. Consider the implications this has for the nature of work in adulthood.

The Next Amazon? 5 Tips for Launching a Student-Run Store — and Teaching Entrepreneurship

The Innovation Lab, at New Jersey’s Fair Haven school district, is our 5th and 6th grade STEAM creation. Our motto is: We use Design Thinking to make for others. The lab is a blended-learning shared space where students can choose pre-made projects and design challenges from our four pillars—Computer Science, Engineering, Digital Arts, and, now, Entrepreneurship.

From a Teacher: Three Ways Education Startups Get Marketing Wrong

Education is a booming market for startups right now. In fact, EdSurge estimates that there was $1.36 billion raised in education funding in 2014, and $1.85 billion in 2015. Clearly, there’s opportunity—but education technology is also becoming a crowded market.

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