This Professor Uses Virtual Labs to Teach Real-World IT Skills That Employers Want

Steph YoungGonzaga credits online learning with enriching her education and helping establish herself as an IT thought leader. Now she wants to pay it forward.
Instructors can focus on teaching–and not on technical issues.After earning both a Masters and a Doctorate online, and following a successful twenty-year career as a corporate IT executive, YoungGonzaga recently returned to her roots. She pivoted her career in order to focus on supporting students who, just as she did, are pursuing their education online.

How This University Fellow Makes Learning Meaningful by Connecting It To Real Life

The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new lands but seeing with new eyes. —Marcel Proust

In higher education today, learning activities focus on challenging students throughout their studies—enabling them to acquire the knowledge, skills and attributes that will equip them for a rapidly changing and complex world and ensure they have the confidence to thrive as global citizens in the 21st century. The role of educators is to create the environment that best supports this learning process.

How a Flipped Syllabus, Twitter and YouTube Made This Professor Teacher of the Year

A few years after John Boyer began teaching world geography at Virginia Tech, a survey revealed that 58 percent of college-aged Americans could not locate Japan on a map. Sixty-nine percent could not find the United Kingdom.Boyer raced ahead undaunted. He loved the scope and implications of his subject. “The great thing about geography is . . . everything happens somewhere,” he explains. “Geography is the somewhere.”

How One Master Educator Uses Visuals and Tech to Make Dracula a Must-Take Course

When Stanley Stepanic was growing up in Latrobe, Pennsylvania, he lived in a house built in 1823. “Back then,” he says, “it was always cool to say, ‘I live in a haunted house. There’s a ghost here, and she committed suicide during the Civil War.’”“I was obsessed with ghosts and skeletons,” he says, “and Halloween was always my favorite holiday.”When he was five or six years old, Stepanic told his mother he wanted a Halloween-themed birthday party. “I had a cake with a skeleton,” he says, “and I dressed as Dracula.”It was destiny.

How Tech Tools Helped a Part-Time Tutor Become a Full-Time Entrepreneur

As a tutor, Josh Sohn doesn’t simply help students complete their homework or ace their SATs. He tries to make learning profound, “lift and support” the kids he works with, and demonstrate an engagement some parents just can’t provide; he even helped persuade one student not to drop out of school.

How to Become the Netflix of Textbooks—and Make a Digital-First Transformation

Disruptive forces in academic publishing have turned traditional models on their heads. While some publishers are stuck in the more traditional print publishing lifecycle, others are innovating—welcoming new tools and organizational changes into their workflows and cutting their time-to-market in half.

Building a Bridge from 21st Century Learners to 21st Century Earners

Millennials are expected to change jobs or employers four times in their first ten years after college graduation. By age 40, they’ll likely have shown up for work with between 10 and 15 employers. This means that our future workforce should expect to have seasons of work, non-work, as well as periods of looking for work in between. Consider the implications this has for the nature of work in adulthood.

This Accelerator Empowers Low-Income Students to Jump the College-to-Career Divide

Jalil did all that we tell our young people they need to do in order to succeed. He graduated from the Fremont Unified School District and went on to attend De Anza Community College. He worked hard, got good grades, and transferred to San José State University. As a transfer junior, he spent three hours each day commuting back and forth to campus and paid for school with grants and scholarships.

The Math Paradox: What Japan Wants to Learn from the West

When it comes to teaching math and science, is the grass always greener across the Pacific Ocean?

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