technology

When the Robots Come for Our Jobs, They’ll Spare the Teachers

It seems that every day we read about newer and better applications of artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML). Smart appliances that order groceries? No problem. Cars that drive themselves? Done. Need a good movie to watch? Better than your best friend’s last recommendation.

Illuminate Education Acquires Homegrown Data Visualization Tool, eduCLIMBER

What began as a husband-and-wife skunkworks project in rural Wisconsin four years ago has now become absorbed into an education data company that boasts millions of users across 44 states.In 2013, systems engineer Matt Harris wrote a program to help his wife, a school psychologist, collect and analyze data to help her students. From there the tool spread via word of mouth, and within six months the pet project became a company, eduCLIMBER, where Matt was CEO.

The Secret to Being a Better Teacher? Find Your Tribe

On November 20th, 2015, I received an email in my inbox that would change my teaching career—it was from a stranger.A few weeks earlier, I had won the Georgia Governor’s award for innovative teaching. My principal noticed how much work I was putting into redesigning my curriculum and had nominated me. I secretly hoped I would win—I wanted validation that I was doing right by my students.

?Chromageddon Comedown: Educators Are Wary After Thousands of Google Devices Fail

Kelly Dumont is an education technologist for Canyons School District in Sandy, Utah. On December 5, his district was one of many around the country that experienced a massive Chromebook error that caused hundreds of thousands of devices to temporarily disconnect from the internet.

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Is This Hiring Process a Better Way to Find That Perfect Candidate?

I’m starting a school. That statement took a year for me to feel comfortable saying out loud. It’s not just a dream, or a lofty goal—it’s actuality—and since I’ve launched my hiring process, it’s becoming more real with each passing day.

Will Net Neutrality Reversal Hurt Digital Learning? As Vote Approaches, Mixed Opinions

Many university faculty members and higher-ed advocates are on edge this week over an upcoming vote by the Federal Communications Commission on Thursday that may reverse net neutrality.

How To Buy Bitcoin—And Why You Should Consider It

How To Buy Bitcoin—And Why You Should Consider It by TeachThought Staff The following links are affiliate links. You can read more about our affiliate policy here, but the general premise is that we receive a very small % of revenue from anything you buy via clicking. If you want to make sure the seller […]
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Ready Station1? Former MIT Dean Shares More Details About Her New Research University

When Christine Ortiz announced nearly two years ago that she was taking leave from her job as a dean at MIT to build a new kind of research university, the idea went viral, even though she offered few details. The effort didn’t even have a name yet.

How to ReMake Your Classroom and Inspire Hands-On Learning in the New Year

Over the past decade, Making has transformed education with its emphasis on innovation, collaboration, and hands-on problem solving. Along the way, new tools have evolved to help teachers ignite creativity and tackle real world challenges. EdSurge has shared these educators' stories—as well as those of students who tinker and take risks, build confidence and develop resilience.

How Teaching Using Mindfulness or Growth Mindset Can Backfire

Art Markman is an expert on what makes people tick. The psychology professor at UT Austin has also become a popular voice working to translate research from the lab into advice for a general audience. He’s co-authored popular books, including Brain Briefs Answers to the Most and Least Pressing Questions About Your Mind. He also writes a blog for Psychology Today magazine, and co-hosts a podcast through Austin’s NPR station called Two Guys on Your Head.

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