For Teachers

How Intelligent Tutoring Systems Make Deep Learning Possible

For 30 years, the Harold W. McGraw, Jr. Prize in Education has been one of the most prestigious awards in the field, honoring outstanding individuals who have dedicated themselves to improving education through innovative and successful approaches. The prize is awarded annually through an alliance between The Harold W. McGraw, Jr. Family Foundation, McGraw-Hill Education and Arizona State University.

How to Engage Your Students With the 12-Minute Rule and Quizzes They’re Meant to Fail

Quick: In which Asian country is it customary to touch the elbow of your right arm with the fingers of your left hand when you are passing an object to another person?

Going Paperless Benefits Teachers, Students—and the Bottom Line

Remember the many hours you used to spend preparing and printing documents each week, only to watch them make their way from students’ desks to the floor, the trash bin or the bottom of their backpacks? This was the reality for teachers living in the paper era.

What YouTube and Hollywood Divas Can Teach You About Active Learning

YouTube videos for extra credit. Guidebooks to structure group work. A tattoo writing exercise. Vocab riddles. These active learning strategies can work in any course—for any major, in any discipline. A theater professor can be inspired by an organic chemistry professor; an anatomy professor can share a strategy with an economics lecturer; and more. The possibilities are infinite.

How Differentiating Instruction Helps Students Connect to Learning

“Stay out of jail!” That was the subject line of an email I received shortly after I started in my new role as CEO at Achieve3000.

40,000 Classroom Observations Point to Three Key Strategies for Continuous Improvement

Our research found significantly higher student performance at schools that measure fundamental school quality factors and boast high levels of student engagement.What effect does student engagement have on student performance and school quality? A lot, according to the more than 80,000 hours of classroom observations we conducted around the world.

Three Ways Technology Can Help Teachers Differentiate Student Learning

“The wide range of differences found among children when they first enter school is sufficient to tax the skill of the most capable teacher.”

Efficiency, Motivation and Comprehension = the 'Skill, Will and Thrill' of Reading

Nick Mack, a fourth-grade teacher in Burlington, Vermont, says his students are at a transformative stage of their early education. “Around fourth grade, students transition from just reading for reading’s sake—or just for pleasure—to reading for understanding content,” he explains. But if students are reading inefficiently, it means they can’t get enough information from the text to develop background knowledge—or to acquire vocabulary.

Three Things Teachers Need to Spot—and Stop—Plagiarism

Ask any educator who teaches five classes of 30 students each per day; there’s a lot of homework to assess. And if that homework involves writing assignments, the hours add up fast. Checking student work for possible plagiarism, specifically, has become a time consuming burden for many educators.

Free Range Teaching and the Technology Teachers ‘Beg For’

When Central Coast Grammar School (CCGS) refurbished a block of classrooms recently, it installed wireless screen mirroring technology in every room. Then the Australian K-12 school did something really radical. “We literally threw out our teachers’ desks,” says Damon Cooper, an English teacher and the director of teaching and learning at CCGS, in New South Wales. “There are just classrooms, and we can teach from anywhere within them.” He explains, “we’ve physically centered the room around the children. It’s not a theory; it’s not a philosophy; it’s not an approach.

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