School Infrastructure

When Is It Okay for Public School Officials to Attend Tech-Funded Events?

The education technology industry often gets flak for not seeking the perspectives of educators. So these days, companies, nonprofits and researchers make working closely with teachers and administrators as one of their main priorities.

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?New Report Spells Out How to Connect 6.5M Students in Schools Without Internet

The digital divide is showing real signs of narrowing—but there are still 6.5 million students in under-connected schools, according to a new report by the nonprofit EducationSuperHighway, which analyzes data from E-rate applications.

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?A Fight for Internet Access Is Brewing in Alaska

If you think your monthly internet bill is high, try $233,817. That’s how much Nome Public Schools in Alaska is charged for its 700 students, according E-rate data gathered by nonprofit EducationSuperHighway.

A steep price like that is not unheard of for rural districts in Alaska—and some people worry it might only get worse.

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North Carolina’s Digital Success Story

For over a decade, North Carolina has been the site of one of the most sustained, successful initiatives in education: giving all students in all schools access to broadband internet with WiFi in every classroom by 2018.

Stakeholders—from educators and nonprofits to politicians and private companies—have all rowed in one direction to spur the strategic use of technology to ensure that all students have access to a great education.

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At CETPA, District Leaders Rethink the Classroom, From Furniture to Funding

Last week, more than a thousand education technology professionals showed up on election week for the California Educational Technology Professionals Association annual conference in Sacramento to discuss all-things tech in their local districts. The conference included about 156 sessions and 24 labs, where topics ranged from data and security to how to best use smart technology in classrooms.

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U.S. Dept. of Ed. Unveils Free Online Tool for Rapid Evaluation of Edtech Products

“Procurement.” In education, the mouthful term often evokes fear and frustration. For many schools and districts, it refers to a long, laborious process of finding and selecting technology, curriculum and other resources—oftentimes spending millions of dollars in the process. And not all procurement leads to products that produce results, because it’s difficult for districts to track that effectiveness.

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How Can We Measure Edtech's Return on Investment?

One day at Stanford D.School (Institute of Design at Stanford), an Oakland team and I were building paper planes as part of a design thinking activity. We thought our goal was to build the “best” plane so that’s what we built; in actuality, the D.School wanted us to land the plane in a 2x2 target on the other side of an opague wall. When we flew all six planes over the wall, we had no idea how well we performed - did anything land in the target zone? Were we even remotely successful?

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Oklahoma Joins Ranks of States and Agencies Cracking Down on Virtual Charter Schools

The Oklahoma Department of Education is moving to shut down a virtual charter school, ABLE Charter, for the first time ever, according to Oklahoma Watch. The Statewide Virtual Charter School Board, the organization within the Department that regulates these types of schools, has moved to end its contract with the one-year-old school for noncompliance several laws. 

Edtech Will Reach Its Full Potential in Public Schools, Not Charters

On the surface, it may seem like charter schools are the ideal testing grounds for educational technology. They’re designed to be small and nimble. These “incubators of innovation,” as President Obama called them, are able to quickly try out new ideas.But in the journey towards successfully implementing educational technology in classrooms, the tortoise may outpace the hare.

The Math Paradox: What Japan Wants to Learn from the West

When it comes to teaching math and science, is the grass always greener across the Pacific Ocean?

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