Jobs & Careers

Report: The Credentials People Get Are Not Always the Ones Companies Want

Almost 30 percent of industry-recognized credentials American students recently earned relate to careers in architecture and construction. Yet just 8 percent of them are in demand by employers.And only .1 percent of students earned a particular credential that could lead to a nearly $82,000 information technology job.These are just some of the findings teased Monday at a SXSW EDU panel on industry-recognized credentials developed or adopted by businesses to verify students have the technical skills needed for certain jobs.

A Student Improved a Classroom Tech Solution—So the Company Hired Him

Tom Sargent, the information technology administrator at the King David School outside of Melbourne, had seen students try to tweak the school’s technology systems before. But when 10th grader Dean Levinson approached him with an idea to enhance their recently installed wireless screen-mirroring and video streaming technology from Vivi, it may have been the first time a kid had actually asked before he hacked.

How to Prepare Students for Jobs in the Self-Driving-Car-Industry

Many roads lead to a career in the self-driving car industry. That painfully obvious pun is actually one of the truest things you can say about this nascent, multidisciplinary enterprise, and it also encapsulates the challenge educators who want to prepare their students to work in this industry are facing today.

Dear Liberal Arts Major: STEM Companies Need Your Skills to Grow

Jennifer Wolochow majored in philosophy and religion at Stanford, hoping to become a high school teacher.“I just really enjoyed learning about why people believe different things around the world and how that informs their actions everyday,” she said.But instead of a classroom, Wolochow now works on the Silicon Valley campus of a company that’s using technology to make learning more accessible to people throughout the world.

How This Business Simulation Prepared My Students for 21st-Century Careers

High-schooler Caitlyn sits in front of a computer on the campus of Rider University, frantically scanning various pop-ups on her screen. Business reports, market trends and price fluctuations race through her mind, as she seeks the one piece of information she needs. Her team is spending the day figuring out how to effectively sell bottled water in three German provinces— all while competing against six other groups doing the same.

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