higher education

How College Faculty Can Beat the Cheat

Students cheating on assignments is hardly a new or surprising problem. But it may surprise college faculty to find out just how widespread it is today. In research and surveys conducted by Dr. Donald McCabe and the International Center for Academic Integrity over the span of 12 years, 68 percent of undergraduates who responded admitted to cheating on tests or written assignments.

Moving from Face-to-Face to Online Teaching Can Be Hard. Here’s One Expert’s Advice.

Enrollment in online courses is rising. But the shift to online instruction can be challenging for some instructors who have spent most of their academic careers teaching (and learning) face-to-face. At the 2018 OLC Accelerate conference in Orlando on Wednesday, Julin Sharp, director of digital education at Marist College in Poughkeepsie, New York, discussed reasons why that transition can be daunting.

Coursera Co-Founder Andrew Ng Wants to Bring ‘AI to Everyone’ in Latest Course

In popular culture, artificial intelligence is used to describe anything from product recommendations to self-driving cars and futuristic robotic overlords. With such broad interpretations of AI, Andrew Ng wants to simplify things for the average person in a new course called AI for Everyone.

How to Build an Online Learning Program Students Crave and Employers Want

One of the great challenges for any educator is how do you teach and test students on real world problems, not just on theoretical textbook examples?

How to Engage Your Students With the 12-Minute Rule and Quizzes They’re Meant to Fail

Quick: In which Asian country is it customary to touch the elbow of your right arm with the fingers of your left hand when you are passing an object to another person?

Robots Won’t Replace Instructors, 2 Penn State Educators Argue. Instead, They’ll Help Them Be ‘More Human.’

How will artificial intelligence and machine learning change teaching? It’s a question that some higher education instructors have asked before, and one that two Penn State University educators sought to answer on Wednesday at this year’s EDUCAUSE conference in Denver.Jennifer Sparrow, the university’s senior director of teaching and learning with technology, thinks the fears that some faculty have about artificial intelligence taking their jobs echos the concern some had 20 years ago when higher education was first “branching out into online learning.”

Campus Support for OER is Growing, Survey Finds

The number of colleges running efforts to help professors shift from published textbooks to low-cost online materials known as OER is growing rapidly.That was one key finding in the latest Campus Computing Survey, one of the largest annual surveys of college technology leaders in the U.S., which was released today.Nearly two thirds of colleges in the survey—64 percent—reported campus programs to “encourage faculty to use OER content for their courses.” That was up from 34 percent in 2014.

The Beginning of a New Era in the Online Degree Market

The online degree market has been one of the fastest-growing and most resilient segments of American higher education over the last two decades. Today, more than three million students pursue higher education fully online, representing a $20-billion market. While online students are still only about 15 percent of all higher education enrollment in the U.S., it’s an area that is likely to continue to grow and make up a larger piece of the overall pie, given growing interest from students, more offerings from colleges, and increasing acceptance by employers

3 Tips For Keeping Class Content Current (Even If You Use Multiple Learning Management Systems)

The following is the latest installment of the new EdSurge advice column about teaching in higher education. You can pose a question for a future column here.

What YouTube and Hollywood Divas Can Teach You About Active Learning

YouTube videos for extra credit. Guidebooks to structure group work. A tattoo writing exercise. Vocab riddles. These active learning strategies can work in any course—for any major, in any discipline. A theater professor can be inspired by an organic chemistry professor; an anatomy professor can share a strategy with an economics lecturer; and more. The possibilities are infinite.

Syndicate content