Game-Based Learning

How an Open-World Video Game Teaches Kids STEM

Imagine learning math and science from the perspective of a middle or high school student. The student’s mental image of the subject is more than likely that of a textbook—dense, daunting, and dry—accompanied by a sigh exclaiming, “Please, anything but this!”

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Where in the World Is Planet3? An Educational Gaming CEO Seeks His Second Act

When Tim Kelly started Planet3 in 2013, he aimed for the stars. He envisioned a game-based educational platform used by teachers and students to learn about science and the environment.He had the staff, as many as 35 employees with experience in game and curriculum development. He had the money, at least $13 million raised by July 2016. And he had interest from educators who wanted to try Planet3 in schools that included the Las Vegas area.

Can a Neuroscience Video Game Treat ADHD?

On the homepage of the health technology company Akili Interactive, there sits an intriguing line of copy: “Time to Play Your Medicine.”

Learn How to Teach Computer Science With MINECRAFT: EDUCATION EDITION [Infographic]

Looking for innovative ways to bring computational thinking and computer science skills to your STEM classes? MINECRAFT: EDUCATION EDITION might be just the teaching tool for you, whether you’re an experienced player or are just learning about Minecraft.Below are all the resources you’ll need to kickstart a game-based learning adventure in your classroom—no advanced degree in gaming required.

Esports Scholarships Are Growing. Do They Leave Some Students Behind?

Maybe you’ve heard of esports? It’s a $900 million industry with nearly 400 million viewers worldwide that is growing by leaps and bounds every year. You may have seen the photos of stadiums packed to the gills with crazed fans or photos of young high school- and college-aged players hoisting sparkling trophies high into the air as they pull in million-dollar prize purses.

Leveling Up Language Learners’ 21st-Century Skills with Minecraft

“Can we set the story in Minecraft?”We had been working for several weeks on a storytelling unit in my ESL classes in 2012. We had read and analysed short stories, examined the grammar of narrative tenses, looked into setting, character descriptions and developing plots. It was time to create our own stories.Yet, one group was struggling for ideas. I needed to intervene. I suggested taking inspiration from a story they knew. What films had they watched recently? Were there any popular TV shows to use as a starting point?“Or video games,” one student suggested.

Playing Games Can Build 21st-Century Skills. Research Explains How.

As anyone who’s ever spent hours hunched over Candy Crush can attest, there’s something special about games. Sure they’re fun, but they can also be absorbing, frustrating, challenging and complex.

This District Rolled Out Minecraft and Teacher Collaboration Skyrocketed

When Roanoke County Public Schools gathered educators for their first training in how to teach with Minecraft: Education Edition (M:EE), “you could hear the rumble in the room,” says Jeff Terry, the district’s director of technology. That was early 2018. Today, his district is among the top ten for M:EE usage worldwide.

All I Really Need to Know I Learned from Playing Video Games

From high school valedictorian to game company CEO to computer science instructor, all I really needed to know, I’ve learned from video games. With lessons ranging from time management to algorithmic graph search, here are three of the games that have influenced me the most, and what I’ve learned from playing each of them.Final FantasyMin-maxing is a resource-management term used often in terms of gaming strategy. It is the process of maximizing results while minimizing resources spent.

Game-Based Learning Is Changing How We Teach. Here's Why.

Dan White, the co-founder and CEO of Filament Games, an educational video game developer based in Madison, WI, knows from personal experience that kids can get a lot more out of video games than entertainment, sharpened reflexes and enviable manual dexterity. Back in the '90s he was a devotee of Civilization, a game where players run an empire from the dawn of time to the Space Age. “Along that timeline you make all sorts of interesting strategic decisions about your empire,” says White. “Now I run a 40-person ‘empire’ at Filament.

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