Game-Based Learning

Leveling Up Language Learners’ 21st-Century Skills with Minecraft

“Can we set the story in Minecraft?”We had been working for several weeks on a storytelling unit in my ESL classes in 2012. We had read and analysed short stories, examined the grammar of narrative tenses, looked into setting, character descriptions and developing plots. It was time to create our own stories.Yet, one group was struggling for ideas. I needed to intervene. I suggested taking inspiration from a story they knew. What films had they watched recently? Were there any popular TV shows to use as a starting point?“Or video games,” one student suggested.

Playing Games Can Build 21st-Century Skills. Research Explains How.

As anyone who’s ever spent hours hunched over Candy Crush can attest, there’s something special about games. Sure they’re fun, but they can also be absorbing, frustrating, challenging and complex.

This District Rolled Out Minecraft and Teacher Collaboration Skyrocketed

When Roanoke County Public Schools gathered educators for their first training in how to teach with Minecraft: Education Edition (M:EE), “you could hear the rumble in the room,” says Jeff Terry, the district’s director of technology. That was early 2018. Today, his district is among the top ten for M:EE usage worldwide.

All I Really Need to Know I Learned from Playing Video Games

From high school valedictorian to game company CEO to computer science instructor, all I really needed to know, I’ve learned from video games. With lessons ranging from time management to algorithmic graph search, here are three of the games that have influenced me the most, and what I’ve learned from playing each of them.Final FantasyMin-maxing is a resource-management term used often in terms of gaming strategy. It is the process of maximizing results while minimizing resources spent.

Game-Based Learning Is Changing How We Teach. Here's Why.

Dan White, the co-founder and CEO of Filament Games, an educational video game developer based in Madison, WI, knows from personal experience that kids can get a lot more out of video games than entertainment, sharpened reflexes and enviable manual dexterity. Back in the '90s he was a devotee of Civilization, a game where players run an empire from the dawn of time to the Space Age. “Along that timeline you make all sorts of interesting strategic decisions about your empire,” says White. “Now I run a 40-person ‘empire’ at Filament.

Can Designing Video Games Help Kids Gain Hard and Soft Skills?

Steve Isaacs has long identified as a gamer. And when he’s not spending time with some of his favorites—StarCraft and Hearthstone—he’s teaching middle school students how to build their own.Isaacs, an educator at William Annin Middle School in Basking Ridge, New Jersey, teaches two classes on designing video games: a semester-long elective for eighth graders and a six-week course for seventh graders.

Change the Game: Using Minecraft to Teach Students with Autism

I find it baffling that in 2019 I still have to explain why it’s important to play with students, especially when Fortune 500 companies are gamifying their workplace and their customer outreach, profitable gamer-culture on YouTube is on the rise and colleges have eSports teams.

Games Can Breed Uncivil Behavior. They Can Also Teach Digital Citizenship.

For most children, online video games offer an early window into social interactions with friends—and strangers. These virtual realms have become the latest hotspots where parents, teachers and guardians attempt to reinforce safe, positive and responsible behaviors online.

5 Ways Video Games Transform Learning and Prepare Students for Tomorrow's Jobs

Every year, it seems increasingly difficult to predict what tomorrow’s workplace will look like. With the advent of each new technology—like AI, automation, VR/AR, and nanotechnology—comes economic shifts that demand different skills from employees and creates new challenges for both employers and educators.

Why It's Important to Teach Your Students Financial Literacy—and Three Ways to Do It

In Oakland, CA, more than 60 students at James Madison Middle School gather to talk about money. The conversation is robust. One student shares his family’s experience saving for emergencies. Another group debates whether a new bike is a “want” or a “need.” Across the room, two young women are deep in conversation about college majors and future income.

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