flipped classroom

How to Enhance Any Curriculum With Short, Engaging, Accurate Videos

Jadrian Wooten remembers professors instructing him to check out DVD clips from the library when he was an undergrad. Today, as an associate teaching professor of economics at Penn State in University Park, Pennsylvania, Wooten is on the flip side of the camera; he creates his own short educational videos to enhance traditional reading materials and lectures. “Today’s students generally want deeper or more nuanced information from their professors,” he says. “And they like to use video to get foundational information super fast.”

Its 2019. So Why Do 21st-Century Skills Still Matter?

When tech giant Amazon announced its search for a second headquarters site, cities across the country scrambled to produce persuasive pitches. In Loudoun County, Virginia, fourth-graders from Goshen Post Elementary School took up the challenge personally. To create compelling video arguments, student teams interviewed experts in economic development, researched state history and geography, and even wrote poems to sing the praises of their region. When Northern Virginia was ultimately picked as a new HQ site, students were as proud as any civic leaders from their community.

How Academic Publishers Can Push the Boundaries of Digital Learning

In 1455, Johannes Gutenberg did what no one had done before. He printed the first major book, using movable metal type. Books became the gold standard of information storage because they could finally be easily reproduced and shared. From that day forward, the printed book became the foundation of the educational publishing industry.

Why a K-12 Operating System is the Next Step in the Evolution of Edtech

Nearly ten years ago, I started my career in education as a math teacher at a new alternative high school serving over-age, under-credited youth in New York City. My students were labeled “at-risk” of dropping out because they were 16-21 years old and previously unsuccessful in high school. Many suffered from chronic absenteeism, caused by factors such as homelessness, family responsibilities, and/or incarceration.

A Case For Flipping Learning—Without Videos

When professor Lorena Barba talks to other educators about flipping their classrooms, the approach she hears is often similar. Faculty assign homework to expose students to a new concept before they arrive to class, and use class time to ask questions and do more-active learning.In most cases, what professors ask students to do outside the classrooms is watch video lectures, and Barba thinks that part of the flipped approach needs to go, and that professors are relying too much on such videos as a crutch.

Five (Easy-to-Implement) Ways Video Can Have a Powerful Impact on Teaching and Learning

The days of standing in front of the classroom and “lecturing” are long gone. By using video, teachers can keep students engaged in new and innovative ways.

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