education

How Academic Publishers Can Push the Boundaries of Digital Learning

In 1455, Johannes Gutenberg did what no one had done before. He printed the first major book, using movable metal type. Books became the gold standard of information storage because they could finally be easily reproduced and shared. From that day forward, the printed book became the foundation of the educational publishing industry.

Efficiency, Motivation and Comprehension = the 'Skill, Will and Thrill' of Reading

Nick Mack, a fourth-grade teacher in Burlington, Vermont, says his students are at a transformative stage of their early education. “Around fourth grade, students transition from just reading for reading’s sake—or just for pleasure—to reading for understanding content,” he explains. But if students are reading inefficiently, it means they can’t get enough information from the text to develop background knowledge—or to acquire vocabulary.

Bringing Tech to the Tundra: Educators Are Bridging the Technology Gap in Alaska

How are rural schools, which face logistical obstacles unheard of in more urban districts, finding ways to provide their students with technology? If one Alaska district is any indication, it’s through a combination of creative problem solving.

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Summit Schools to Spin Out Learning Program

Summit Public Schools, which over the past four years has led the creation of the “Summit Learning Program” currently used by more than 380 schools around the U.S., said today that it will spin out that program into an independent nonprofit as of the 2019-2020 school year.

A Turnaround Within: How a Texas College Boosted Its Graduation Rates—and Morale

This is the second part of a three-part series looking at how one college in Texas staged a turnaround. Read part one first, then check out the finale on Monday.

In Announcing Winners of Higher Ed Challenge, Ed Dept Looks Ahead to 2030

The U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Educational Technology held its first major event in nearly two years on Thursday, and the main takeaway is that the office is busy planning for the future—2030, to be exact.

New 2-Year Online College Aims to Grow Quickly (But Without Traditional Gen-Ed Courses)

Alternative higher education programs don’t always work out. But one former Harvard University dean is giving it a try. That former Harvard dean, Stephen Kosslyn, opened an online two-year college this week with an experimental academic program promising something between a vocational education and a traditional general-education curriculum. Among its innovations: no homework.

Does OER Actually Improve Learning?

Regardless of where you stand on the debate over open educational resources, you’re probably wondering: Does OER actually improve learning outcomes?This question came up in a handful of discussions this week at the OpenEd conference in Niagara Falls, NY. And the short answer is, most experts still aren’t sure. But it’s probably not making things more difficult for students. At least, that was one of the main takeaways from a short session led by Phillip Grimaldi, director of research at OpenStax, a nonprofit OER initiative out of Rice University.

Beyond Free Materials: OER Advocates Push For Inclusiveness in Teaching Practices

What is your tolerance for failure in education?Jess Mitchell, senior manager of research and design at the Inclusive Design Research Centre, posed the question on Wednesday to a group of around 850 educators, librarians and other open-access enthusiasts at Lumen Learning’s OpenEd conference in Niagara Falls, NY.

New Competition Wants to Bring Ethics to Undergraduate Computer Science Classrooms

Much has been said and written about the need to teach ethics in computer science education—especially in light of major controversies such as with

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