Diversity and Equity

Jay-Z, Kanye, and MLK—Using Lyrics and Literary Devices to Teach Students to Write

Cree was scribbling aimlessly with her head down in an intentional posture that made it impossible to make eye contact with me. It was the third quarter of the school year and I was standing at the front of her ninth grade English class. Literary non-fiction was the unit, which meant the students were learning about essays, articles, and speeches. On that particular day, the class was set to examine speeches from Abraham Lincoln and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Canoe as the Classroom: Cultivating Culturally Responsible Navigators and Leaders

In May 2014, 
H?k?le?a, a traditional Native Hawaiian double-hulled canoe, launched on its worldwide voyage to spread the message of M?lama Honua, which translates as “to care for Island Earth.” H?k?le?a is not a modern day vessel with a powerful motor, GPS or even a compass. H?k?le?a has something better. She is powered by the wind, waves and most importantly, a shared vision, mission and values.

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Why Edtech Executives Are Keeping a Close Eye on Preschool Demographics

Edtech executives tell it, there are certain student populations, such as English language learners or ELLs, that haven’t received the investment they deserve. But all that may be changing as investors, tech companies and researchers begin zeroing in on America’s newest school-age cohort—namely, the Pre-Kindergarten set.“As new populations surface the market is going to correct itself,” noted Tory Patterson the managing director and co-founder of Owl Ventures, referring specifically to ELLs.

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The Importance of Teaching a 360° Perspective on Columbus Day

In 2015, the city of Albuquerque declared that instead of celebrating Columbus Day on the second Monday of October, it would commemorate Indigenous Peoples’ Day. Last year, Santa Fe followed suit, and just recently, Los Angeles announced that it would add Indigenous Peoples’ Day to its municipal calendar as well.

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Seven Ways to Use Google Docs to Support Bilingual Student Writers

The room is filled with chatter in Arabic, French, and Ukrainian as my class of 9th, 10th and 11th grade emergent bilingual students file into third period, grabbing their iPads off the cart before they settle into reading. Title III federal grant funds from the previous year made it possible for me to create a 1:1 classroom for students enrolled in ESL at Seaholm and Groves High Schools in Birmingham, Michigan, a northern suburb of Detroit.

Teachers, Students and Tech Giants Push Back Against Decision to End DACA

Just as many schools and campuses resume after summer break, the Trump Administration ended a program that had allowed hundreds of thousands of students whose parents are undocumented to remain in the US to pursue their studies. The announcement to rescind the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program has drawn sharp criticism from leaders in K-12 and higher education, as well as from technology leaders.

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Campus Libraries Are Centers of Information, But Not of Diversity (At Least Among Librarians)

Academic research libraries are many things: knowledge storehouses, teaching and research partners, technology hubs. When it comes to the people who staff and lead them, however, these institutions look too much the same, skewing heavily white and female. That assessment, which won’t surprise anyone who has been paying attention at library conferences, is one of the standout findings of a report released today by the nonprofit group Ithaka S+R.

Girls Who Code’s Rally For Women in Tech Takes Over New York City Square

“The future of tech is female!”

“We are here to challenge the status quo!”

“Join me in this fight for equality!”

Those were just a sampling of the chants from the Rally for Women in Tech hosted this evening in New York City’s Union Square Park by Girls Who Code, a nonprofit that aims to close the gender gap in technology.

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The Next Big Thing: Creating Communities of Making to Celebrate Students' Heritage and Culture

For years, school leaders in Loudoun County, Virginia “had been talking about a one-to-one technology initiative,” says Josh Ajima, instructional facilitator for technology at Dominion High School and Loudoun Academy of Science. “But it kept getting pushed back and back. It had been five or six years that they had been talking about, ‘the next big thing.’”

Nonprofit Bootcamps Want to Make Coding Accessible to Low-Income Learners

One of the selling points of for-profit coding bootcamps is their stellar placement rates (with some boasting as high as 100 percent of their students get jobs in the field after graduation). While some question those numbers, engineer Michelle Glauser sees a bigger problem—she says many of those bootcamps simply limit their enrollments to people who don’t need much more expertise to land a great job, to keep those numbers high.

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