Data and Research

Collaborative Higher Ed Partnerships Are the Key to Student Success

As the labor market becomes increasingly dependent on skilled workers who have at least some education beyond high school—whether that means an associate or bachelor’s degree, or a professional credential—student success in college is as important as it has ever been. Regrettably, though, large numbers of students in the United States do not have access to higher education opportunities. Many cannot afford the high cost of college; others do not know how to apply for college or what their educational opportunities are post-high school.

Five Dangers of Data-Informed Student Nudging

In 2016, leaked email exchanges from Mount St. Mary’s University revealed then-president Simon Newman’s plan to inflate retention stats by encouraging students with a higher likelihood of dropping out to drop out early. It was a move that reignited the debate about the role of data and intervention in higher education.

Here Are Three Types of Administrators Who Drive Achievement—and Two Who Don't

In the months since launching our school and district pilot program, the Kiddom team has collectively spent thousands of hours meeting with administrators to better understand their workflows, facilitate contextualized staff workshops, and support ongoing partnerships. Our goal?

Three Career Paths for Educational Innovators—How to Get There and Where the Jobs Are

The seeds of innovation are planted at a young age, and technological advances now provide learners of all ages the opportunity to be creators, builders, designers, producers and makers. STEAM-based learning emphasizes both hands-on and digital experiences with engineering, art, game design, prototyping in makerspaces, authoring, robotics, and much more. Students and teachers are learning to innovate hand-in-hand. Where there is innovation, entrepreneurship often follows.

How This University Fellow Makes Learning Meaningful by Connecting It To Real Life

The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new lands but seeing with new eyes. —Marcel Proust

In higher education today, learning activities focus on challenging students throughout their studies—enabling them to acquire the knowledge, skills and attributes that will equip them for a rapidly changing and complex world and ensure they have the confidence to thrive as global citizens in the 21st century. The role of educators is to create the environment that best supports this learning process.

Five Ways to Make Peer Feedback Effective In Your Classroom

Three years ago I was teaching a graduate computer science course with 20 students. When students weren’t solving assignments or giving presentations, I was able to spend my time interacting with them one-on-one. The class operated smoothly. Then I changed the title of the course to include the words “big data”. Next year my course—using the same curriculum—had 150 students sign up!

How AR and VR Prepare Students for Jobs of the Future (and Save Districts Money)

Imagine a high school student in your district. Her class is learning about muscles, but instead of watching a video or reading about it in a book, she can move a virtual arm and see an exposed bicep muscle contract. Are engines her thing? She can safely experiment with a virtual torque wrench in a mechanics class. It sounds powerful, doesn’t it? Not to mention effective.

How Social Media Encourages Plagiarism (and Six Ways You Can Fight It)

Has the ubiquity of social media given plagiarism new life?

What Research Says About Driving Growth for Writers With Practice, Feedback and Revision

Because we know that becoming a successful writer is crucial to a student’s overall trajectory at school, work, and as a citizen, teachers must identify the tools that can best support writing instruction including the overlapping processes of drafting, review, an

Using Tech to Support Literacy Across 13.8 Billion Years of History

Using OER is hard. Finding good lessons, videos, articles and activities is hard. Putting these pieces together to create a coherent school year is hard. Making sure the approach to reading and writing across materials created by a bunch of different people is hard. Finding time to do that work is even harder.

Syndicate content