coding

Teaching Coding to Kids: What Programming Language Should We Use?

One of the most common questions I get from teachers and parents is: What programming language should we use to teach kids to code? Is it important to always start with block-based languages like Scratch? At what age should they transition to text-based languages? And how do I choose between Python, Java or JavaScript?

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Tynker Offers a Good Way to Introduce Students to Programming

Tynker is a service that provides activities to help students developing coding skills. I first tried Tynker years ago and have watched it grow from a simple app to a full-blown coding curriculum for...

How 60 Minutes Oversimplified the Gender Gap and Overlooked Women in Tech

When Americans tuned in to watch last Sunday’s segment of 60 Minutes, they learned that the vast gender gap in the tech industry is shrinking, thanks to “one group that may have a chance to finally crack the code,” as the correspondent put it.

Learn How to Teach Computer Science With MINECRAFT: EDUCATION EDITION [Infographic]

Looking for innovative ways to bring computational thinking and computer science skills to your STEM classes? MINECRAFT: EDUCATION EDITION might be just the teaching tool for you, whether you’re an experienced player or are just learning about Minecraft.Below are all the resources you’ll need to kickstart a game-based learning adventure in your classroom—no advanced degree in gaming required.

Fullstack Academy Enters Extension School Market With First University Partnership

San Luis Obispo, Calif., may be better known for its wineries and golden coastline than its tech economy. But that could change, thanks to a partnership between one of the major universities in the area, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, and Fullstack Academy, a coding bootcamp based in New York and Chicago.

Playing Games Can Build 21st-Century Skills. Research Explains How.

As anyone who’s ever spent hours hunched over Candy Crush can attest, there’s something special about games. Sure they’re fun, but they can also be absorbing, frustrating, challenging and complex.

Game-Based Learning Is Changing How We Teach. Here's Why.

Dan White, the co-founder and CEO of Filament Games, an educational video game developer based in Madison, WI, knows from personal experience that kids can get a lot more out of video games than entertainment, sharpened reflexes and enviable manual dexterity. Back in the '90s he was a devotee of Civilization, a game where players run an empire from the dawn of time to the Space Age. “Along that timeline you make all sorts of interesting strategic decisions about your empire,” says White. “Now I run a 40-person ‘empire’ at Filament.

At the Top of Teachers’ Wish Lists? Tactile STEM Projects, Flexible Furniture and Books

Last year, 274,000 classroom projects were imagined, funded and fulfilled because of an idea one teacher had almost two decades ago.That idea gave way to DonorsChoose.org, a nonprofit where teachers can create projects and request resources to help their students, and then donors come in to put up the funds. In 2018, it reached classrooms in 52,000 schools, or nearly half of all public schools in the U.S.

Make Your Classroom More Like a Playground Than a Playpen Using ‘Hard Fun’

Every educator knows that children, especially those 4 to 7, learn a great deal through play. Harnessing that power for classroom learning can be tricky, though.

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