Assessment Driven Curriculum

Four Classroom-Ready Tips to Boost Reading Engagement and Drive Learning

What leads to reading success? In my view, success with reading doesn’t follow from drill and kill practices that stifle interest and motivation. Rather, it follows from nurturing a love of reading and closing the reading engagement gap—the discrepancy between how students engage with modern digital content and how they engage with traditional texts in school.

How AR and VR Can Inspire Innovation—and Boost College and Career Readiness

At 17 years old, Christine Johns sat in a university classroom surrounded by men and women who were devastated as Pittsburgh's steel industry collapsed around them. Displaced steelworkers and stay-at-home mothers found themselves desperate for an education—and the work it would help secure.

Four Ways Digital Financial Education Is Improving Student Outcomes

In 2015, my organization embarked on an ambitious initiative to improve financial capacity in middle school students across the United States. Research found that by the age of 12, students had developed an economic understanding that was “essentially adult”—but they did not have the education or skills needed to tackle many complex financial decisions.

Five (Easy-to-Implement) Ways Video Can Have a Powerful Impact on Teaching and Learning

The days of standing in front of the classroom and “lecturing” are long gone. By using video, teachers can keep students engaged in new and innovative ways.

Why It's Important to Teach Your Students Financial Literacy—and Three Ways to Do It

In Oakland, CA, more than 60 students at James Madison Middle School gather to talk about money. The conversation is robust. One student shares his family’s experience saving for emergencies. Another group debates whether a new bike is a “want” or a “need.” Across the room, two young women are deep in conversation about college majors and future income.

How One Educator Found Work-Life Balance By Teaching Online—From Her Living Room

World maps, colorful letter charts and a felt animal poster line the walls of LaShundra Wigfall’s classroom. Toy cars, her puppet (BaBa the sheep) and other teaching props lay waiting for her to bring them to life with her jovial voice and infectious energy. But Wigfall’s classroom isn’t in a school; it’s smack dab in the middle of her living room. Instead of 20 or more students, she teaches just one student at a time. And some days...she wears her pajama bottoms to class.

Three Ways to Support Educators Who Hate to Teach Writing

“Another English teacher just switched to gym because she couldn’t do it anymore,” a teacher from Georgia recently told me. “I love teaching and helping kids grow,” she added, “but I hate that writing instruction takes up hours and hours of my life.” She’s not alone in her sentiments. A 2016 study of 3rd to 8th grade educators found that only 55% of teachers said they enjoy teaching writing.

Here Are Three Types of Administrators Who Drive Achievement—and Two Who Don't

In the months since launching our school and district pilot program, the Kiddom team has collectively spent thousands of hours meeting with administrators to better understand their workflows, facilitate contextualized staff workshops, and support ongoing partnerships. Our goal?

How This University Fellow Makes Learning Meaningful by Connecting It To Real Life

The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new lands but seeing with new eyes. —Marcel Proust

In higher education today, learning activities focus on challenging students throughout their studies—enabling them to acquire the knowledge, skills and attributes that will equip them for a rapidly changing and complex world and ensure they have the confidence to thrive as global citizens in the 21st century. The role of educators is to create the environment that best supports this learning process.

Five Ways Teachers Can Use—and Create—Augmented Reality Experiences

A fourth-grade student at Mendez Elementary in San Marcos, Texas, held an iPad out in front of her. On the screen, she saw her classroom just as though she were using the camera, but with one startling difference: There was a zombie floating in front of her. Zombies had taken over the school library, and she and her fellow students had to work together to answer various questions about books—such as identifying where the index is located. “This is kind of scary,” she told her teacher, Yvonne Rodriguez, “but fun.”

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