Assessment Driven Curriculum

Three Principles of Writing Instruction in a Personalized Learning Classroom

Writing is a deeply personal act. From process to deadlines, no two people approach writing in the exact same way. Take, for instance, environment. While some people prefer to write in complete silence, others need the din of a coffee shop to focus. Or, if you are like me, the friendly hum of the same song on endless repeat helps the words flow. These disparate settings have one thing in common: excellent writing can emerge from each. 

Spotting Trends and Delivering Data to Connect Edtech Tools With Educator Needs

Data’s influence on modern education is immense; it drives policies, impacts funding—it even affects decisions about which tools and services edtech companies create for educators. And when it comes to helping edtech entrepreneurs understand those educators, Amy Rambo believes she has just the data that can help.

PD for Writing Teachers: STEM Workshops, Rockstar Camps, Twitter and More!

“Must be nice to have summers off!” All teachers hear this statement multiple times in their careers. Indeed, as an English teacher at University High School in Irvine, I glory in my summers—but not to sleep in or binge on Netflix or even to travel for weeks at a time. Rather, I recharge myself with self-designed PD.

Assessing Creative Writing Is Hard, So Here Are Three Ways To Avoid It

Everyone knows that outside of the school building, creative writing workshops aren’t graded. Whether it’s a group of retirees who cluster in the back of your corner coffee shop or the so-called Ponzi schemes of MFA programs like the famed Iowa Writers’ Workshop, assessment comes in the form of peer feedback—marginalia and discussion.

How Tech Tools Helped a Part-Time Tutor Become a Full-Time Entrepreneur

As a tutor, Josh Sohn doesn’t simply help students complete their homework or ace their SATs. He tries to make learning profound, “lift and support” the kids he works with, and demonstrate an engagement some parents just can’t provide; he even helped persuade one student not to drop out of school.

From Analog to Digital: Why and How to Teach Students to Write for an Online Audience

When was the last time you wrote an essay? When was the last time you read one other than for grading? Now think about the frequency with which you read online articles, blogs, social media posts or listen to podcasts that inspire you or provide new information and perspectives. When did you last watch YouTube to figure out how to do something complicated, from cross stitch to car repair?

Empower Educators to Teach Writing with PD, Practice and Tools That Extend Their Reach

The caterwauling about the inability of U.S. students to write well goes back decades.
Newsweek published its ballyhooed screed Why Johnny Can’t Write in 1975. This past summer, The New York Times chimed in with Why Kids Can’t Write. Fifteen hundred readers weighed in on that piece. (Who says Americans can’t write?)

Early Learning Faces Obstacles and Inequities—Here's How Edtech Can Help

Remember the days when Farmer Eddie taught youngsters what the pig and cow says by pulling the See 'n Say string? Edtech for early learners has come a long way since then, but our just-released compilation of research—what we call a Market Gap Snapshot—makes clear there is still a lot of room to expand and improve edtech solutions to address obstacles facing our youngest students.

A Student Agency Game Plan—How to Use Data to Bridge Choice and Accountability

A few years ago, Harvard’s Achievement Gap Institute conducted a study on teaching and student agency. The study recognized agency as potentially “…as important an outcome of schooling as the skills we measure with standardized testing.” Indeed, when students take ownership of their education, they become more invested in the outcome. Learning about things that fascinate them helps them pay closer attention, process more efficiently, and engage in critical thinking.

Three Ways You Can Harness Personalized Learning to Promote a Growth Mindset

If you’ve spent time instituting Stanford professor Carol Dweck’s work on mindsets in your classroom, you know that having a growth mindset is all about embracing the power of “yet.” Students may not know something yet, but that shouldn’t stop them from figuring out the answer, improving their skills, or meeting their academic goals.

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