Tony Wan

What’s in a Word? Mrs. Wordsmith Raises $11 Million to Become the ‘Pixar of Literacy.’

If a picture is worth a thousand words, then some investors are betting that pictures of words could be worth millions of dollars. Specifically, $11 million—which is what Mrs. Wordsmith, a London-based education startup, has raised in its Series A round.The deal was led by Trustbridge Partners, and previous investors Reach Capital and Kindred Venture Capital returned to contribute to this round. (Reach Capital is also an investor in EdSurge.) To date, Mrs. Wordsmith has raised $14.5 million.

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Online Learning Platform, NovoEd Acquired by Boston Private Equity Firm

Boston-based private equity firm Devonshire Investors has acquired NovoEd, a San Francisco-based provider of an online learning platform. Terms of the acquisition deal were not disclosed.

The Most Important Skills for the 4th Industrial Revolution? Try Ethics and Philosophy.

For those keeping count, the world is now entering the Fourth Industrial Revolution. That’s the term coined by Klaus Schwab, founder and executive chairman of the World Economic Forum, to describe a time when new technologies blur the physical, digital and biological boundaries of our lives.

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Achieve3000 Acquires Literacy Startup Actively Learn

Stuart Udell has overseen nearly two dozen mergers and acquisitions across his career in the education industry, which spans stints at Penn Foster, Catapult Learning and K12 Inc. Now, just a few months into his current role as CEO at Achieve3000, Udell is already adding another company to the list.

A Tiny Thanks Goes a Long Way — in Helping Students Forge Social-Emotional Connections

When was the last time you said thanks?Expressing gratitude with that one word may seem commonplace, perhaps even an afterthought. But research suggests that we say “thanks” much less often that we presume. The Australian researcher who led the study found that those who helped others were thanked in just one of 20 instances.

Conrad Wolfram: Let’s Build a New Math Curriculum That Assumes Computers Exist

Has the math brand become toxic? That was the provocative question posed by Conrad Wolfram in a blog post earlier this summer. “Sadly,” he wrote, “I’ve started to conclude that the answer is yes.”

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When Education CEOs and Bigwig Financiers Go ‘Back to School’

Students and teachers were not the only ones to return to class this week.Nearly a thousand of the education industry’s C-level executives, private equity fund managers and investors gathered at BMO Capital’s “Back to School” conference in New York City. On their syllabus: networking and identifying the latest market trends in the education industry that can drive a company’s growth—and, of course, financial returns.

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Former ED Official Joins Bootcamp Lender to Lead Quality Assurance Efforts

It’s not uncommon for U.S. Department of Education (ED) officials to go on to work in education technology after Washington. Former education secretary Arne Duncan is now a partner at Emerson Collective, and has also joined the board of directors at edtech companies including Pluralsight and Turnitin. Former directors at Education Department’s technology office, including Karen Cator, Richard Culatta and Joseph South, now hold executive roles at different education technology nonprofits.

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Companies Are Bought, Not Sold: M&A Advice From 3 Edtech CEOs Who Survived the Process

At the start of this decade, the education industry saw hundreds of flowers bloom. Launched from garages and tech accelerators, startup after startup burst onto the scene with technology tools for the education market.The industry has since consolidated, due in part to an uptick in mergers and acquisitions by education companies and private equity firms. Data from investment bank, Berkery Noyes suggest these deals have grown at a steady clip since 2013.

Carnegie Learning Gets a Makeover After Private Equity Investment

Private equity’s pursuit to acquire puzzle pieces to build comprehensive educational technology platforms shows no sign of slowing down.

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