Robert Ubell

Opinion: With the Fox in the Henhouse, Betsy DeVos’s Ed Department Is Hurting Low-Income College Students

In the 19 months since becoming the U.S. Secretary of Education, Betsy DeVos has issued a rush of announcements that remove or undermine previous rules designed to protect students from predatory corporate-run colleges and student debt-collection agencies—changes that are likely to impact low-income students disproportionately.

Does Online Education Help Low-income Students Succeed?

From the start, access has been the defining achievement of online learning. Or so I thought.

How Risk-Averse Universities Take Risks with Satellite Campuses Abroad

Like airline pilots, college leaders aren’t known for risky behavior. On the contrary, they’re a pretty cautious bunch. But when it comes to launching satellite campuses abroad, some have been flying blind.Negotiating deals with foreign institutions, mostly in the Middle East and Asia, where 51 U.S. universities have planted college banners at 83 foreign campuses, you’d often think they lost their judgement.

Why College Is Not an Employment Agency

A new book makes “The Case Against Education.” It’s decidedly not something to give to a high-school junior looking to get into college.

Will Online Ever Conquer Higher Ed?

The latest data on the nation’s college and university enrollment shows that online is steadily climbing its way up to more than a third of the student population—as face-to-face continues to plummet. That’s a surprising turn in the long-time arc of academic population growth.

From Neutrality to Inequality: Why the FCC Is Dismantling Equal Access and What It Could Mean for Education

Faculty members who teach face-to-face may imagine that last week’s vote by the Federal Communications Commission to dismantle net neutrality doesn’t touch them, since their instruction is exclusively on campus, not plugged in to the web. Unfortunately, they’re mistaken.

How Online Can Save Small, Private Colleges from Going Under

In the wake of a recent series of small-college closings, the takeaway for small private colleges is that their days may be numbered. Since these schools are largely dependent on student tuition in a time when demographic changes mean fewer available high school graduates, they might as well be on an endangered-species list.

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