Kelli Anderson

This Tech Tool Can Save Teachers 10 Minutes Per Class

While the fate of humanity did not rest on her pulling it off, Australian English teacher Sarah Gunn faced a daunting task. Her high school literature students at St. Laurence’s College in Brisbane had just 50 minutes to write up a formative assessment on the representation of robots and artificial intelligence in the movies. For that to happen, she had to play five-minute clips from both "The Avengers: Age of Ultron" and "Wall-E" in quick succession—twice.

If You Want Equity in the Classroom, Above-Average Readers Need Intervention Too

I think every child needs to have some kind of reading intervention.Michael Ballone, director of curriculum for the K-8 Marlboro Township Public Schools in New Jersey, has a clear idea of what most literacy instruction gets wrong: it only serves struggling readers. “I think every child needs to have some kind of reading intervention,” says Ballone, a former seventh-grade English teacher. “It might mean acceleration or it might mean remediation.

How Intelligent Tutoring Systems Make Deep Learning Possible

For 30 years, the Harold W. McGraw, Jr. Prize in Education has been one of the most prestigious awards in the field, honoring outstanding individuals who have dedicated themselves to improving education through innovative and successful approaches. The prize is awarded annually through an alliance between The Harold W. McGraw, Jr. Family Foundation, McGraw-Hill Education and Arizona State University.

Literacy Tools That Bring Equity and Energy to the Classroom—and Unlock Career Doors

Reading was easy for Dr. Doug Fisher when he was growing up in San Diego, but it wasn’t for everybody. “I had friends who were illiterate,” he says. “They just pretended they could read, and the teachers pretended, and they graduated.” As a freshman at San Diego State University, Fisher wrote his first English comp paper on illiteracy in America. “Somehow, that seed was there for a really long time.”

How to Engage Your Students With the 12-Minute Rule and Quizzes They’re Meant to Fail

Quick: In which Asian country is it customary to touch the elbow of your right arm with the fingers of your left hand when you are passing an object to another person?

Free Range Teaching and the Technology Teachers ‘Beg For’

When Central Coast Grammar School (CCGS) refurbished a block of classrooms recently, it installed wireless screen mirroring technology in every room. Then the Australian K-12 school did something really radical. “We literally threw out our teachers’ desks,” says Damon Cooper, an English teacher and the director of teaching and learning at CCGS, in New South Wales. “There are just classrooms, and we can teach from anywhere within them.” He explains, “we’ve physically centered the room around the children. It’s not a theory; it’s not a philosophy; it’s not an approach.

Reading Is Visually Unnatural—Here's How to Help Students Who Struggle

When Mark Taylor was growing up near Huntington, NY, his house had a special draw no other home in the neighborhood could boast: a basement full of prisms, projectors and other cool optometric gadgets. His friends loved coming over to mess around with the devices, but these were no mere toys: they were part of a family legacy.

How to Help Students Land the STEM Jobs of the Future

For nearly 30 years, the global non-profit FIRST has been getting kids hooked on science and technology through hands-on robotics competitions featuring come-from-behind victories and breathless spectators clamoring for TV coverage. It all happens thanks to a network of corporate partnerships that let students peer into the real world of STEM careers while giving companies a chance to engage with ambitious and energetic students.

How Robotics Competitions Close the STEM Skills Gap and Build a Diverse Workforce

For nearly 30 years, the global non-profit FIRST has been getting kids hooked on science and technology through hands-on robotics competitions for grades K-12—complete with cheering crowds, adrenaline rushes and teams snatching victory from the jaws of defeat. Students invent products, apply for patents, and fall in love with science.

Georgia State Professor—and Student Success Innovator—Awarded McGraw Prize in Education

For 30 years, the Harold W. McGraw, Jr. Prize in Education has been one of the most prestigious awards in the field, honoring outstanding individuals who have dedicated themselves to improving education through innovative and successful approaches. The prize is awarded annually through an alliance between The Harold W. McGraw, Jr. Family Foundation, McGraw-Hill Education and Arizona State University.

Syndicate content